wiki:PLATFORM_NFR_USABILITY_R0
Last modified 11 years ago Last modified on 11/03/08 14:20:21

Error: Macro BackLinksMenu(None) failed
compressed data is corrupt

Analysis

Overview

Create a document as a part of the specification. Examples:

  • Tooltips
  • Keyboard accessibility etc.
  • Assistive technologies.

These are things that should be pointed out and written down. Look wikipedia for a good example explanation of this task.
Quotes you may find useful:

Human-computer interaction and computer science, usability usually refers to the elegance and clarity with which the interaction with a computer program or a web site is designed.
The key benefits of usability are:

    * Higher revenues through increased sales
    * Increased user efficiency
    * Reduced development costs
    * Reduced support costs

Usability includes:
    * Learnability: How easy is it for users to accomplish basic tasks the first time they encounter the design?
    * Efficiency: Once users have learned the design, how quickly can they perform tasks?
    * Memorability: When users return to the design after a period of not using it, how easily can they re establish proficiency?
    * Errors: How many errors do users make, how severe are these errors, and how easily can they recover from the errors?
    * Satisfaction: How pleasant is it to use the design?

Goals of usability testing:

Usability testing is a black-box testing technique. The aim is to observe people using the product to discover errors and areas of improvement. Usability testing generally involves measuring how well test subjects respond in four areas: efficiency, accuracy, recall, and emotional response. The results of the first test can be treated as a baseline or control measurement; all subsequent tests can then be compared to the baseline to indicate improvement.

    * Performance -- How much time, and how many steps, are required for people to complete basic tasks? (For example, find something to buy, create a new account, and order the item.)
    * Accuracy -- How many mistakes did people make? (And were they fatal or recoverable with the right information?)
    * Recall -- How much does the person remember afterwards or after periods of non-use?
    * Emotional response -- How does the person feel about the tasks completed? Is the person confident, stressed? Would the user recommend this system to a friend?
Usability includes considerations such as:

    * Who are the users, what do they know, and what can they learn?
    * What do users want or need to do?
    * What is the general background of the users?
    * What is the context in which the user is working?
    * What has to be left to the machine?

Answers to these can be obtained by conducting user and task analysis at the start of the project.

Other considerations

    * Can users easily accomplish their intended tasks? For example, can users accomplish intended tasks at their intended speed?
    * How much training do users need?
    * What documentation or other supporting materials are available to help the user? Can users find the solutions they seek in these materials?
    * What and how many errors do users make when interacting with the product?
    * Can the user recover from errors? What do users have to do to recover from errors? Does the product help users recover from errors? For example, does software present comprehensible, informative, non-threatening error messages?
    * Are there provisions for meeting the special needs of users with disabilities? (accessibility)


Task requirements

Create a wiki page PLATFORM_NFR_USABILITY and fill in expected usability issues and solutions that Sophie2 will offer. Part 1

  • Learnability: How easy is it for users to accomplish basic tasks the first time they encounter the design?
  • Efficiency: Once users have learned the design, how quickly can they perform tasks?
  • Memorability: When users return to the design after a period of not using it, how easily can they re establish proficiency?
    • Another benefit of the tooltips and simple concept, also overlapping features (halos and right clicks), common used keyboard shortcuts, intuitive solutions as base bound controls.
  • Errors: How many errors do users make, how severe are these errors, and how easily can they recover from the errors?
  • Satisfaction: How pleasant is it to use the design?

Part 2

  • Can users easily accomplish their intended tasks? For example, can users accomplish intended tasks at their intended speed?
  • How much training do users need?
  • What documentation or other supporting materials are available to help the user? Can users find the solutions they seek in these materials?
  • What and how many errors do users make when interacting with the product?
  • Can the user recover from errors? What do users have to do to recover from errors? Does the product help users recover from errors? For example, does software present comprehensible, informative, non-threatening error messages?
  • Are there provisions for meeting the special needs of users with disabilities? (accessibility)

Evaluate these aspects and offer solutions that will be present in Sophie2 for easing the interaction between the user and the application.

Task result

The result of this task must be a wiki page.

Implementation idea

The main concept is that Sophie2 has a glossary with few terms in it that are simple enough to get familiar with. These include frame, frame content, flaps, tabs, palettes. Usability is improved by tooltips that should be present almost everywhere and keyboard shortcuts known from most applications. Sophie also includes innovative technologies that are easy to understand - like base bound controls.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-functional_requirements

How to demo

Present the result, explain problems and solutions mentioned above.

Design

Contents of the documents, explanations and links:

  • User related:
    • What do users want or need to do?
      • Adding frames
      • Adding content
      • Editing content
      • Reading
    • What is the general background of the users?
      • The target group is students and users interested in creating documents with rich media content.
  • Interaction related:
    • Learnability: How easy is it for users to accomplish basic tasks the first time they encounter the design? How much training do users need? What documentation or other supporting materials are available to help the user? Can users find the solutions they seek in these materials?
      • What are basic tasks - creating a book, reading a book, sharing a book, collaborative editing.
      • Explanation of terms - glossary. Benefits of using this concept.
      • Tooltips (planned)
      • Startpage (unplanned, may be startup tips or something else)
      • User documentation (we have a pre-alpha of it)
      • Mail list, Forum, wiki.
      • Are there provisions for meeting the special needs of users with disabilities?
    • Efficiency: Once users have learned the design, how quickly can they perform tasks?
      • Statement of how easy it will be.
    • Recall: How much does the person remember afterwards or after periods of non-use?
    • Errors and mistakes: How many errors do users make, how severe are these errors, and how easily can they recover from the errors? What do users have to do to recover from errors? Does the product help users recover from errors? For example, does software present comprehensible, informative, non-threatening error messages?
      • Program errors are automatically sent to the developers.
      • Reporting issues
      • Help and support (community support)
    • Performance: How much time, and how many steps, are required for people to complete basic tasks?
      • Creating a book
      • Loading a book
      • Sharing a book
      • Collaborative editing
    • Emotional response: How does the person feel about the tasks completed? Is the person confident, stressed? How pleasant is it to use the design? Would the user recommend this system to a friend?
      • User interface, extensibility and options.
      • Benefits of open source - the ability to participate with ideas realizations, etc.(community ideas for improvement, skinning).
      • Benefits of plugin structure.
      • Rendering solutions.
      • Templates.

Add shortcuts to related specifications, user manuals, shortcuts, etc.

Implementation

PLATFORM_NFR_USABILITY Created structure from design section, added usability solutions that are discussed and part of the work breakdown structure. In later revisions must be provided links to user manual, drag n drop table, keyboard shortcuts, diagrams, glossary pages.

Testing

Comments

(from Dan: )

  • We need a focus on "reading" a book rather than "viewing" the book - if Sophie 2 is to succeed in an academic environment, people will need to be able to spend a lot of time in Sophie Reader reading and commenting on books and user experience in the Reader is very important to this.
  • To the glossary, I'd add "timeline" and "page template" as these seem to be the two concepts that confuse people.
  • Does multilingual support fit in here?
  • Tooltips: are these tooltips or balloon help (as exists in Sophie 1)? If balloon help we might want the option to turn them off for more advanced users.
  • The "skilled user" concept might need to be thought about - one thing we found with Sophie 1 was that users who were "skilled" by a regular definition (experience with Adobe applications, for example) were more confused by the interface than those who didn't know very much about making things on a computer because the halo/HUD interface was very different to anything they were used to. Maybe this changes in Sophie 2 as the interface becomes more normal?
  • Reporting issues: I think we need to make this easier for users - often developers didn't get enough information about what actually went wrong in a book in the Sophie 1 bug-reporting system. (There are also privacy concerns here.)

Log

Error: Macro Include(wiki:PLATFORM_NFR_USABILITY_R0_LOG) failed
current transaction is aborted, commands ignored until end of transaction block